Backpacking/Hiking

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Backpacking/Hiking

Postby bluebait » Tue Jul 22, 2014 7:43 am

Hello all,

It's been awhile since I've been on here. Had some issues with the truck, couple wrecks, frakenstein work but now I'm back. Anyway, I've recently gotten back into hiking/backpacking. I've hiked before, a mile or so here and there but me and my significant other have really jumped into it here lately. Got bored one day and decided to go to the local section of the AT and hike the 1.3 mile trip down to the Laurel Falls, very nice set of falls if you ever get the chance to head to East TN. Anyway ended up hiking 5 miles total, just didn't want to stop. I've always enjoyed hiking and due to my ex being difficult, could never really "hike". My fantastic girlfriend now loves it just as much as I do and we've hiked around 15 miles total this week alone, going every other day. I'm trying to work myself and her up to hiking a 23 mile streatch of the AT that goes from right above my house to the NC state line that would take at least two days, enjoying the scenary and not pushing too hard. So my question is, are there any avid hikers/backpackers on here?? I've looked through and did'nt find many posts that mentioned it. I was looking for any pointers or advice for working up to multiple day hikes if anyone has been on any. I've looked online and found "tips and tricks" to it but there's nothing that replaces experience. Any thoughts and ideas, stories or trips please feel free to share!!!
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Re: Backpacking/Hiking

Postby Sags » Wed Jul 23, 2014 3:44 am

I worked for 6 summers as a backpacking guide 2005-2010 (for a BSA high adventure base) in the Wind River range, Wyoming. 8-10 weeks a summer, out all week, leave Monday morning, get back Friday night, chill out Saturday and Sunday back at base, and do it again with a different group, and hopefully different trip, the next week. I was also a Leave No Trace trainer there, we usually did rock climbing and rappelling on our trips too.

I pretty much grew up backpacking from my early teens on, in addition to all my time in the Wind Rivers, I've done more trips then I can remember all over Utah, Wyoming, Montana, Idaho. When I lived in Montana, I think I did just about every trail you can do in Yellowstone, did a lot of trips in the National Parks in Utah too, and the Uintas. After high school I kinda had about 3-4 years, where all I did was work odd jobs here and there with lots of backpacking trips in between (and ski-bum in the winter) then all my backpacking buddies got real jobs, or got married, or left, so I went and was a missionary for 2 years, then after that is when I worked at the BSA camp in Wyoming. Just thinking about it I did some quick math, and I spent ~ 215 nights out just with my 6 summers working in the Wind Rivers. I'd bet all told I've spend 300-400 nights out on the trail.

Haven't done more then a few overnighters and car-camping since I've been in Alaska, but I'll have some paid vacation next summer and plan to do at least a couple week long trips, one in Denali for sure, maybe another in the White Mtns, if I can swing it.

Anyway if you have any specific questions about gear, food, skills, ethics, or whatever ask away. I've gotten a little fat and lazy over the past 2-3 years since I haven't been out as much, but all the knowledge is still there. Never been back east, so I can't help with specifics of the AT, but I'm sure it's not that different.
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Re: Backpacking/Hiking

Postby bluebait » Wed Jul 23, 2014 11:29 am

Yeah I'd say anything in Alaska is going to be a bit more interesting :D . I've always wanted to go to Alaska. Anyway, Like I said, I've always wondered around in the woods and have always had the drive to find a trail and just see whats at the other end. I've been doing a few miles every other day, as there's quite a bit to hike around here, trying to get used to have a backpack and getting used to the weight. It's by no means a daypack or anything of that nature, it's just a well padded backpack but it gets the job done. I'm planning to do an overnight but funding may push it to next year for tents and sleeping bags and whatnot. Do you have an suggestions as to items to keep at all times that you've learned over the years is a must?? Any pointers on food or overnighters?? I've really missed being outdoors and cannot get enough of it. I only go every other day so I don't hurt anything. As far as the trails go, I have come across one or two that were a little sketchy. Went down one Monday that was a mile literally on the side of the mountain up against huge boulders and big drops but it's always worth what the trail leads too!!!
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Re: Backpacking/Hiking

Postby N law » Wed Jul 23, 2014 1:39 pm

I haven't been backpacking in quite some time, but like you, I have been wanting to get out there and do some more. I was looking at the AT as well and thought about planning a couple day long trip from the southern tip up to the NC boarder. It's been a few years so I'm out of shape as well, but the knowledge doesn't really go away. If I were starting from scratch, I'd find the BSA backpacking or hiking merit badge books and read up on a fairly conservative approach to hiking. Over time, you will learn the items you don't really use and will just leave them out. I think short of planning your route, letting someone know where/when, and then packing you bag and humping down the trail, it only your mental determination that will help you get further.

Sags, I had not heard about the base in Wyoming. I had the awesome opportunity to attend Northern Tier, Philmont and Sea Base Bahamas. Those places were freaking awesome and I loved all of the activities we got to do. I'd love to go back. Maybe one day!
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Re: Backpacking/Hiking

Postby IsuzuGeek » Wed Jul 23, 2014 1:54 pm

Yeah, there's really nothing better, than wheeling in your Zu to some remote spot, then spending the day hiking the surrounding area. I love Eastern TN, I used to camp at Fall Creek Falls.

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Re: Backpacking/Hiking

Postby N law » Wed Jul 23, 2014 2:19 pm

IsuzuGeek wrote:I love Eastern TN, I used to camp at Fall Creek Falls.


I think I'll go there the second weekend of October if everything works out
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Re: Backpacking/Hiking

Postby IsuzuGeek » Wed Jul 23, 2014 2:23 pm

Yeah, I miss that area. I used to camp there every year for Thanksgiving week with my friends, back when I lived in Chicago.

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Re: Backpacking/Hiking

Postby Chitzu » Wed Jul 23, 2014 9:03 pm

The A T is a lot like going up and down stairs 2 at a time with breaks here and there. Love it but can't go down with bad legs, up is easy. :bigsmurf:
Leaving for Lake Winfield Scott in the morning, need some air.
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Re: Backpacking/Hiking

Postby bluebait » Thu Jul 24, 2014 11:42 am

Never heard of Falls Creek. My intentions are to hike all of the surronding areas, about 50-60 miles in one cluster worth of trails, leading up to my 2-3 day hike and so on. Right now the dream it to accomplish the entire trail from GA to MA, but thats a few years, some more experience and a few mistakes away. It's nice to leave work and go for a 2-4 hour hike every other day. Got so used to going home and doing nothing I forgot what was ALL around me. I'm trying to get a whole day to spend. There's a 9 mile(there and back) hike up Pond Mountain that I'm looking forward to just to try to push myself further to that 23 mile hike and more!!
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Re: Backpacking/Hiking

Postby IsuzuGeek » Thu Jul 24, 2014 11:51 am

bluebait wrote:Never heard of Falls Creek.


This is the spot: http://tnstateparks.com/parks/about/fall-creek-falls

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Re: Backpacking/Hiking

Postby N law » Thu Jul 24, 2014 12:04 pm

bluebait wrote:Never heard of Falls Creek.


It is just like the name: Falls, Creek, Falls. You slide down the natural water slides of the upper falls and then you swim in the creek for maybe 100 yards, but you don't jump off the lower falls :shock: You can hike down to them. Its a truly amazing place with nice little day hikes all around. I believe Bansil's Tortuga has been there.
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Re: Backpacking/Hiking

Postby Sags » Sat Jul 26, 2014 4:51 pm

bluebait wrote:Do you have an suggestions as to items to keep at all times that you've learned over the years is a must?? Any pointers on food or overnighters??


What you pack is totally dependent on the trip you are doing... Are you in desert or mountains, plentiful water or not, mild temperatures or cold, bear country or not, traveling on a trail or off-trail/overland, will mosquitoes be an issue?

When I'm packing I think about survival first, there are 3 things you need to survive: food, water and shelter.

Food:

I'm not much of a backcountry cook, so I like to keep it simple. I pack freeze-dried dinners (Mountain House, Backpackers Pantry, AlpineAire, Richmoor, etc..) Most of them you can just boil some water, pour it in the bag, stir it up, let it sit for 10 minutes and eat it right out of the bag. No dishes to do that way. For breakfast I'll pack instant oatmeal or mush, granola/nutrigrain bars, hot cocoa or cider, granola etc. For lunches I'll get stuff like tortillas and bagels, pepperoni or salami or summer sausage, string cheese, cream cheese, pilot biscuits/bread, peanut butter and jelly. Maybe some Ramen noodles if I feel like getting out the stove. I also always some spices since some freeze dried dinners are pretty bland, I've found these spice packs to be handy. As for a stove, I have several. I like to use canister stoves in the summer, and liquid fuel in the winter (since canisters lose pressure as temperature drops.) Although I've wanted to try a trick of wrapping some copper wire around your canister and over the burner to preheat the canister when it's cold, canister stoves are just much simpler to operate. My current go to stoves are an Optimus Crux, and a MSR Whisperlite, I also have a Coleman Featherlight just because they are bombproof.

Once again though, even food depends on they type of trip you are doing. If you are winter camping out in sub-freezing temperatures you are going to need a lot more calories, and a lot more hot foods, then in the summer. Also you want to repackage all you food into ziplocks to save on bulk and weight and waste from all the factory packaging.

Water:

How much water you carry is totally dependent on the availability of water where you are going. Water is heavy (8lbs a gallon) so you don't want to carry more then is really necessary. Some trips I'll only carry a single Nalgene bottle (1 qt.) and some in a camelbak because there are rivers and lakes everywhere. In the desert down in southern Utah though, I've done trips carrying 2 Nalgene bottles, and a full 2 liter camelbak. As for water treatment, there are a ton of options out there now. As long as you're in North America and not a third world country, you only need a filter, and not a chemical purifier, people use the terms water 'filter' and water 'purifier' interchangeably, but there is a difference. A filter is just a filter, they are measure in microns, ie how small a bug or bacteria can fit through this filter. A purifier is usually a chemical (or UV light with the SteriPen) that doesn't filter anything out, it just kills any living organism. Like I said in first world countries a filter is just fine, plus it filters out all the 'floaties' as well. My personal favorite water filter (and I've use a lot of them) is my MSR Miniworks it's not the fastest filter out there, but it's uses a field maintainable 0.2 micron ceramic filter, which means no packing extra filter elements, and the ceramic lasts a long, long time. I've had mine since 1999 (they've changed the look several times since then, but the filter element is the same) and only replaced the filter 4-5 times, and I used it a LOT.

Shelter:

Shelter to me consists of a tent or bivy sack, sleeping bag, and sleeping pad, and clothes. There are so many excellent choices out there today I'm not even going to get into it. Just buy the nicest, lightest gear you can afford and you won't be disappointed. If you can get a hold of Backpacker Magazines annual gear review issue get it. I've got 3 tents, a bivy sack, 2 sleeping bags (20° and 0°) a bag liner (for when it's well below 0°) and 3 sleeping pads, which I use individually in summer, or combine for more insulation in winter. As for clothes, one rule to always remember is "Cotton Kills". No cotton clothes, cotton does not breathe, or wick moisture, it acts like a sponge. Even if you don't get wet cotton is still bad, it will absorb all your sweat when your working hard, then suddenly you stop for the night and the temperature drops, and you in a soaked with sweat t-shirt and your freezing to death. You want polyester or nylon of stuff like that that wicks moisture and is quick drying for a base layer, same goes for insulating layers, wool or fleece are best. And always wool socks, I wear smartwool socks, they are expensive but the best socks you can get in my opinion.

Other necessities you should always have is a first aid kit, map and compass, whatever meds and toiletries you need, and always leave an itinerary with someone so they can call SAR if needed.
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Re: Backpacking/Hiking

Postby bluebait » Wed Jul 30, 2014 8:42 am

Well around here during the spring and summer months it's humid and the terrain is all mountainous. For the most part water is pleantiful however did run into some issues the other day but I'll get into that later :( i carry two water bottles worth of water, one a sports bottle, the other a bobble. As most of my hikes are no more that 5-6 miles total I haven't needed anymore. I haven't gotten my hands on a filtration system or purification tablets just yet but plan to very soon. I found a great website that has a write up on the different types and thier functions, http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/Backpacki ... er-Reviews. Sorry don't have fancy web address attachment skills :D. As far as food goes I always keep a couple cliff bars, belvita biscuits and trail mix as well as a container of protein powder and a vial of Juggernaunt for an extra boost, which came in good use when I got lost. I have my handy dandy compass/whistle and always have my cell phone(99% of the time I can access GPS but am trying to find a good map for the area). I keep rain gear, emergency ponchos, a huge hefty bag, a compact sleeping blanket, water shoes, a hatchet (have gotten some wierd looks), flashlight, nylon cord, tissue paper, zip lock baggies, multi tool, pocket knife, lighter, extra socks and first aid kit. I still need to get my hands on a tent, sleeping bag and cooking system. I found this one, http://www.sierratradingpost.com/bleuet ... essed=true. It seems pretty decent for a couple of overnight trips, nothing too bulky or heavy and between two people using MRE type meals should be enough. I'm not really a fan of carring liquid or compressed fuel. I just picture a big black burnt spot on the side of a mountain and pieces of what used to be me :D.
As for getting lost, I've learned to go back the way I came. I didn't actually get lost, I wandered out further than I thought I had and was not aware the trail blazes had been painted a different color from the map I had used before I started. Then a huge storm decided to shift my way, tornadoes, 80-100 mph winds, lightining LOTS of rain. It was a very interesting experience let's put it that way. Luckily GPS worked and I found a service road near by that lead to the highway and off the mountain. What was supposed to be a 5 mile round trip ended up being right at 10 miles from where we started across the mountain and 20 miles worth a drive away :shock:. I was extremely exhausted and slightly dehydrated but made it down and called for a ride. Didn't have it in me to go back across. :D. So, leasson learned. Need filtration system for water bad and when I feel like I've wandered too far, turn around and turn around quick. Beinig at the tip top of the mountain in a an open area when big black flashing clouds roll in really makes you think twice.
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Re: Backpacking/Hiking

Postby N law » Wed Jul 30, 2014 9:47 am

For water filtration/purification, I have a bottle of Polar Pure. Unfortunately, people have abused it over the years and it is now banned from production because the iodine is a key ingredient to meth. I have a bottle that I've had for 15 years. People were buying cases a week at our local Army/Navy store and they just busted the clerk for selling it, despite his asking the police if something was up since the demand greatly increase within a year or so. I think I still have plenty of years left, but it is a really awesome way to purify water if you can find it. It is a small glass bottle that you fill with water and wait. The crystals in the bottom make an iodine solution which you then put the appropriate number of capfuls in your water bottle. Shake and wait an hour. You of course top off the Polar Pure Bottle each time and its perpetually ready to go. A small baffle keeps the crystals from pouring out.
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Re: Backpacking/Hiking

Postby bluebait » Fri Aug 01, 2014 8:36 am

I've always been kinda wary of the iodine and bleach methods of water purification. Seems kinda gross if ya ask me :D. Think I'd rather take my chances with micro-organisms. I do like the UV Pen that they've come out with now, however it leaves the dead guys in the water but still better than bleach or iodine......bluh. Don't get me wrong, the bottle is a neat idea. I wonder why it didn't last. I've seen the filter/bottle setups meant to treat spring/river water but they look cheap and fragile.
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Re: Backpacking/Hiking

Postby N law » Fri Aug 01, 2014 10:46 am

bluebait wrote:I wonder why it didn't last.


Your federal government and the great state of California!

From their website:
Because of regulations with the state of CA and federal DEA, we have been unable to purchase iodine in order to manufacture and sell Polar Pure since May 2011. Polar Pure is no longer available for sale anywhere.


It's because it worked as intended and was used to make meth.
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Re: Backpacking/Hiking

Postby bluebait » Fri Aug 01, 2014 11:16 am

My bad, looked over the meth production part, but leave it to the ignorant to ruin it for the rest. If anyone casres to see here's a link http://bit.ly/1xKGZ2z to the route I'm working towards for my 2 day hike. I've already hiked about 6 miles of it but want to do it from start to finish to experience the entire route. I'm thinking I may not be able to hike the entire trail at once and may be limited to doing a section at a time. I guess that's better than not at all. With working and finances, I'd have to wait until retirement to do so :shock:. I'd rather experience it while I'm young and able :D
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Re: Backpacking/Hiking

Postby Sags » Fri Aug 01, 2014 10:08 pm

I'll never use Iodine, chlorine, micro-pur tablets, etc. unless I'm in a third-world country, for several reasons.

First, all chemical treatments take time to work, some up to an hour. Well in a hiking or backpacking situation, when you stop at the stream to fill up on water you want/need it now. Second they are more complicated/easier to screw up, how many drops of chlorine for what size bottle? How long do I need to wait for this much water, treated with this much iodine, etc. Third it's unnecessary. Unless you are in a third world country, there are no bugs (bacterial, protozoan, or viral) in North America or Europe that can fit through a .3 micron filter which make you sick. Fourth, some studies have shown that some of the bigger protozoa (like giardia) are actually not killed by a standard dose of iodine, their shells are to thick. Fifth, with chemical treatments, you're still drinking whatever crap and other floaties are in the water. Sixth, cross-contamination (this goes for Steri-pen, and those bottles with built in filters as well) Think about it, so you dip your water bottle in the stream/lake to fill it, then you treat the water inside the bottle... ... what about the water that clings to the threads on the outside of the bottle, or if you get the cap wet, that water will not be treated, but when you stick that to your mouth will still get into you. Finally iodine makes water taste nasty.

Anyway, for all those reasons and more, I recommend getting a pump filter, they are all pretty simple to use, instant, and foolproof (if it goes through the filter it's safe) The only thing is with pumps that have and inlet and outlet hose, be sure to ziploc bag the 'dirty' hose, before you stuff it away to avoid cross contamination.

If you want to be really paranoid, you can filter your water, then add some chlorine drops, I've known people who did this. The filter gets any of the bigger bugs that may be harder for chemicals to kill, and the chlorine kills the rest. This is also the recommended procedure if you are traveling to a third world area... filter then chemical treatment.
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Re: Backpacking/Hiking

Postby bluebait » Mon Aug 04, 2014 7:20 am

Yeah I'm really not comfortable with using chemicals, think I'll stick with filters. Took a little hike this past weekend up to Crabtree Falls. Don't know if anyone has heard of them. They are a nice set of falls on the Blue Ridge Parkway outside of Little Switzerland, NC. Decent little 3 mile loop to some very nice falls. They are 70 feet tall so pretty tall for this area and the waters only about a foot deep so you can climb right up to them and really get the experience in. You then can hike to the very top of the gorge, around 3500 ft above sea leval to an edge, and I mean a sheer edge and look out over the gorge. Very neat place. It used to be a neat campground but they've closed it down this year. Anyway, back to water treatment. Is there any big difference between iodine and chlorine?? Another thing that seems a little confusing, backpacks. What's what?? What's the big difference and aside from nothing more than I need, what should I look for in one?? Thanks again
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Re: Backpacking/Hiking

Postby Sags » Thu Aug 07, 2014 2:00 am

bluebait wrote: Anyway, back to water treatment. Is there any big difference between iodine and chlorine??


Yes, iodine makes your water taste NASTY! While I never use chemicals camping, I actually have used chlorine for water that's in emergency storage. A couple capfuls of Clorox in a 60 gallon drum of water will help it keep a lot longer.

bluebait wrote: Another thing that seems a little confusing, backpacks. What's what?? What's the big difference and aside from nothing more than I need, what should I look for in one?? Thanks again


First off, stick with internal frame packs, external frames are really only needed for big game hunting, or other jobs that require hauling big heavy, awkward, messy loads. For camping/backpacking modern internal frame packs work 1000% better.

Most important thing about backpacks is to get one that fits, there are two dimension critical to a good fit; your torso, and your waist. If you get a pack with too short a torso the weight will always ride on your shoulders, to long and you'll feel like your always about to tip over backwards. This is because you want the weight to be on your legs and not your back, to achieve this you should have a tight waistbelt with the buckle right at your belly button. This will let most of the weight ride on top of your hips, and transfer down through your legs. So you need that waistbelt to be riding just on top of your hips, with the shoulder straps just taking a little weight, but mostly just holding the load tight to your body. Too short a torso and the belt will be to high to work so all the weight is on your shoulders/spine. Too long and you can cinch up the waist belt, but not the shoulderstraps, so your load will be wobbly and loose, pulling your shoulders/spine backwards.

The waist is easy, to measure your torso you go from the bump in your spine at the base of your neck, to an imaginary line between the points of you hip-bone. Every decent pack maker out there makes packs with either adjustable torso length, or 3-4 different options for torso length.

Next important thing is to load your pack right, you want the heaviest items closest to your spine, and the lightest stuff on top and bottom.

Finally you need to know HOW to put on a pack, I know it sounds simple, but people screw it up and it makes them miserable. To put on a pack, and get it to fit most comfortable, first you loosen all the adjustments, then put it on your shoulders, then you cinch down the waistbelt first, you want it good and tight and you kinda have to do a little hop hop thing while your cinching to get it up on your hips. At this point your pack will feel all top heavy and wobbly, so the next thing is to tighten the shoulder straps at their bottom, you know the buckles that every backpack has, even small daypacks, that sit beneath your armpits, those ones. Then the next thing is to cinch up what's call the 'load-lifter' straps. These are the ones that come off at the top of your shoulder and connect to the top part of the back. The last is the sternum strap, just tighten it till it feels comfortable, it helps keep the weight from pulling backwards on your shoulders. I know it sounds complicated, but once you figure out how tight to cinch each strap, and in the right order, it makes the pack fit like it was designed, and the most comfortable, and once you get the hang of it it only takes a few seconds.

As for brands, get whatever you can afford. There are lots of high quality brands out there, if money is no object I think that Mystery Ranch is the very best, and very expensive (I cannot afford them). Then you have next step down would be brands like Osprey, Arc'Teryx, Deuter, Sierra Designs, then kind of the entry level brands are like Kelty, Gregory, The North Face, Alps. Any of them will do. My personal big trip pack is an Osprey 85 liter. I also have an Osprey 45 liter, and a Deuter 30 liter pack. Just stay away from the uber-cheap name you've never heard of stuff, a busted pack strap in the middle of a 50 miler is no fun at all.

As for the style it's just preference. Some people like a lot of pockets to keep everything all organized. Me, I just like to stuff it all in and don't care for packs with a zillion pockets. It's just whatever floats your boat.
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Re: Backpacking/Hiking

Postby bluebait » Mon Aug 11, 2014 9:07 am

WOW :shock:

I would have never thought there was that much involved in getting a pack. No wonder my simple backpack is killing my shoulders. I've seen seceral pack with exterior loops, I guess, for sleeping bags, mats, and things of that nature. Do they really make that big of a difference for transporting equipment or just a fancy add on? I'd like to got one with a hydration pack pocket. I'm a big fan of the packs but at the same time I know that's going to be added weight but being centered on your back it wouldn't seem like it would make that big of an impact. the price tag on some of these things are through the roof!!! I'm keeping an eye on craigslist for a decently priced one. I really don't want to fork out a couple hundred for packs!! :D
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Re: Backpacking/Hiking

Postby N law » Mon Aug 11, 2014 11:06 am

I've used both internal and external framed backpacks. In scouts, we saw a lot of external framed packs because they were cost effective and usually had a lot of opportunity for adjustments when the teenagers were growing (11 to 18 years old). I ended up with an R.E.I. internal framed pack that had a ladder system. It allows for the top of the shoulder straps to be repositioned to allow for longer torsos. I believe this has become more popular, but they are great if you find one that has a lot of flexibility. The waist strap needs to have enough padding, because that is where the weight will bear and it will get sore.

As for the way things are packed, my pack has a large main chamber that tent, clothes, sleeping, food, etc go in. There is a top that flips over and it contains two smaller chambers for toiletries, snacks, things I'd need to access easily while hiking. It really helps to know how you pack and how you want to access stuff. On the external packs, you strap your tent roll and sleeping bag to the frame instead of putting it inside. It makes for a little more awkward pack, but tons of people have used them and they are workhorses. From what I observed, they worked well for scouts starting out since they usually had sleeping bags that didn't pack up super small and they often had the simple piece of foam sleeping pad rolled up instead of a thermarest. As they acquired this type of gear over several seasons, the pack often followed. I wouldn't shy away from it if you came across one used for <$50 since you could get out on the trails and learn how you want to pack while you acquire other gear.

I still have one of each, but all of the strapping that Sags discussed still applies, especially the sternum strap. If you don't have it, the shoulder straps can spread and pull back on your outer shoulders, which makes breathing hard.
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Re: Backpacking/Hiking

Postby Sags » Tue Aug 12, 2014 12:25 am

Here are some articles on pack sizing and fitting for you Bluebait.

http://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice/ ... -size.html

http://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice/ ... g-fit.html

Basically they say the same thing I did, but in a easier to understand format.


As for price... For a big pack of like 75 liters or more $200 is not a bad price for a good name brand. I think I paid around $270 for my 85 liter Osprey and that was 7-8 years ago. Sometime http://www.steepandcheap.com/ has great deals on packs. Moosejaw, and Sierra Trading Post sometimes also have good sales, and there is REI outlet. If you can afford it don't be afraid to spend the money, a good pack will last you for decades.

EDIT: Now I'm checking for deals on packs :lol:

Here's some options for under $150

http://www.rei.com/product/878506/kelty ... 4-closeout

http://www.rei.com/product/878507/kelty ... 4-closeout

http://www.sierratradingpost.com/mounta ... rFamily=01

http://www.moosejaw.com/moosejaw/shop/p ... 000001_-1_

http://www.backcountry.com/alps-mountai ... -GN-ONESIZ
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Re: Backpacking/Hiking

Postby wrs » Wed Aug 20, 2014 4:02 pm

Perhaps this isn't the right spot, but I was given an external frame backpack that I know nothing about.

Image

Image

My questions are; does anyone recognize the logo? And is it easy to find a replacement pack without having to buy the frame again? Not really a fan of the color scheme this one has going on but I do like the frame.

Thanks in advance.

Btw Google and eBay have so far turned up zilch when I search for the answers.
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Re: Backpacking/Hiking

Postby N law » Wed Aug 20, 2014 4:15 pm

wrs wrote:Image

My questions are; does anyone recognize the logo?


Looks like it says Famous No. 237 on that tag. That might be Famous Trails.

Are you trying to win a fashion contest while backpacking? :lol:
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